All Coast Dental

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Use of Retainers

Do you have misaligned teeth that are making you self-conscious? Is it hard to floss because a few teeth are out of place? If so, you may be a good candidate for ClearCorrect orthodontic therapy. At All Coast Dental in Pacific Beach, we use this brand of aligners to help patients achieve perfect smiles. But to get the full benefit of orthodontic therapy, patients need to ensure their teeth stay in place.


One of the most common questions orthodontic patients have is how long they will need to wear their retainer for. The answer is usually going to be for life. Typically, an orthodontic patient would wear their retainer at day and night for a period of time as long as they were undergoing the active part of the therapy. After that, they would transition to only wearing the retainer at night. If they stop wearing it, their teeth may start migrating again. Many people who wear ClearCorrect or other invisible aligners had orthodontic braces as children, but their teeth have since shifted enough to be noticeable. What’s especially convenient about ClearCorrect is that the final aligner doubles as the retainer, so patients will be used to cleaning it and still won’t have any metal in their mouths. As always, the aligner should only be put in after the patient has brushed and flossed, and should be replaced by a dental professional if it breaks or melts.


Drs. Julie and Joseph Boulos operate All Coast Dental at 2180 Garnet Ave, Suite 1-K, Pacific Beach, California, 92109. To schedule an appointment, call 858-270-4904 or visit All Coast Dental and fill out a contact sheet.


 

Thursday, November 7, 2019

Can People with Diabetes get Implants?

This National Diabetes Awareness Month, we at All Coast Dental in Pacific Beach wanted to address the impact diabetes has on oral health. People with diabetes have a more difficult time fighting off infections, which puts them at greater risk of developing gum disease and tooth decay. Consequently, their risk of losing a tooth is elevated. However, recent assessments of scientific research have shown that many diabetic patients can be good candidates for endosteal dental implants, allowing them to regain their bite function.


There are a few important reasons why patients with diabetes need extra attention when getting implants. Placing an implant requires that an incision be made in the gum tissue. People with diabetes take longer to recover from incisions than people without, but the evidence shows that they nearly always recover fully. Another issue is that an implant’s stability can be adversely affected by the gum tissue surrounding it becoming inflamed, and people with diabetes get gum inflammation at higher rates. But the same study found that when their blood sugar is well-controlled, diabetic people’s implants survive at the same rate as those in other people for the first six years.


People with diabetes are at slightly greater risk for implant failure over multiple decades, but this risk can be mitigated through proper oral hygiene. We encourage everybody, but especially people with diabetes, to be attentive to signs of gum disease such as redness and bleeding, and to schedule a cleaning with us right away if they see something troubling. With care, diabetic people can enjoy good oral health throughout life.


Drs. Julie and Joseph Boulos operate All Coast Dental at 2180 Garnet Ave, Suite 1-K, Pacific Beach, California, 92109. To schedule an appointment, call 858-270-4904 or visit All Coast Dental and fill out a contact sheet.


 

Friday, November 1, 2019

Panorex Imaging

As a dental office that provides patients with a full range of care options, we at All Coast Dental in Pacific Beach use the latest technology. Monitoring the eruption of wisdom teeth, the integration of an implant, and the health of the jaw bone all require rigorous x-rays. We use the Panorex, a device that provides a panoramic view of the patient’s mouth, allowing us to provide a superior quality of service.


A patient does not need to prepare for examination with a Panorex anymore than they would for a traditional x-ray. They will simply remove jewelry and other objects and then bite down on the plastic bite stopper on the Panorex machine. (The device may be lowered or raised to match a patient’s height.) Panels will then descend and rotate around the patient’s head while the x-rays are emitted. The whole process takes less than twenty seconds.


Images produced by the Panorex are highly detailed. Although they do not show soft tissues well, they allow us to more accurately predict tooth migration and detect changes in the vertical dimension of a patient’s jaw bone. They are commonly used for planning complex extractions and implant placement. They also subject the patient to fewer x-rays than traditional x-ray photographs and don’t require patients to hold film in their mouths.


Drs. Julie and Joseph Boulos operate All Coast Dental at 2180 Garnet Ave, Suite 1-K, Pacific Beach, California, 92109. To schedule an appointment, call 858-270-4904 or visit All Coast Dental and fill out a contact sheet.


 

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Retained Baby Teeth

Your child is probably excited to get visits from the Tooth Fairy and their grown-up teeth. But what happens when the baby teeth stay put? As dentists who accept patients of all ages, we at All Coast Dental are familiar with oral issues that tend to emerge in childhood. Retaining baby teeth is a serious problem, but one we are well-suited to treat.


Baby teeth are scientifically known as “deciduous teeth.” They usually fall out because the emergence of the adult tooth causes the baby tooth’s root to dissolve. This may not happen when the adult tooth is coming in at the wrong angle or never develops. If the adult tooth and its deciduous equivalent are both present, the teeth are likely to be jumbled and difficult to clean. The presence of a baby tooth without its adult version can also cause bite problems.


Extracting baby teeth is usually a simple matter. Once they’re out, the patient may be referred for orthodontic therapy to correct bite issues. If the adult tooth never developed, an orthodontist might space the patient’s teeth apart to make room for an implant or partial denture.


Drs. Julie and Joseph Boulos operate All Coast Dental at 2180 Garnet Ave, Suite 1-K, Pacific Beach, California, 92109. To schedule an appointment, call 858-270-4904 or visit All Coast Dental and fill out a contact sheet.


 

Friday, October 11, 2019

Incipient Lesions

Do you ever notice that there are white spots on your teeth? Usually, they quickly disappear, but when they linger, they are a sign of a developing dental infection. We at All Coast Dental highly value prevention, so we want our patients to understand how white spot lesions work and why it’s so important to take them seriously.


White spot lesions are called “incipient lesions” because a glazed, white appearance is enamel’s initial response to being demineralized. When enamel is exposed to the acid produced by oral bacteria, there will be a period after it starts losing minerals but before it loses enough mass to form a cavity. This is when the white spot appears. It only takes about thirty days for a white spot to become a cavity, but after an infection is halted, the white spot may linger as a chalky-looking scar.


Incipient lesions can be halted through better brushing, but they usually appear in places such as around orthodontic brackets where the patient has trouble reaching. That’s why orthodontic patients need to master the use of Christmas tree toothbrushes and why people generally should keep a close eye on the bottoms and sides of their teeth, where tartar forms. We can determine whether a white spot still has an active infection, and if the scar lingers, we can discuss cosmetic solutions such as bonding.


Drs. Julie and Joseph Boulos operate All Coast Dental at 2180 Garnet Ave, Suite 1-K, Pacific Beach, California, 92109. To schedule an appointment, call 858-270-4904 or visit All Coast Dental and fill out a contact sheet.


 

Thursday, October 3, 2019

Causes of Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t just unpleasant; it’s a sign of how your oral health is doing. Tooth decay, acid reflux, and other issues associated with gingivitis can all result in foul odors. We at All Coast Dental in Pacific Beach want our patients to be able to recognize the what might be causing halitosis so they can treat it properly or seek our help.


As bacteria consume food particles and metabolize them, they secrete acid as a waste product. The acid gets stuck in the biological film on teeth, creating plaque, and eventually hardening into tartar. There, it causes tooth decay and gum recession and emits a foul odor. Bacteria may also heavily colonize the papillae of the tongue, particularly when the back of the tongue is coated in nasal discharge for the bacteria to feed on. When a patient is suffering from dry mouth, saliva isn’t depriving bacteria of a food source by washing away debris, allowing the bacteria to grow more rapidly.


Bad breath can also be caused by regurgitated stomach acid or by disorders such as diabetes that compromise the immune system. These would weaken the mouth’s defenses against odor-emitting bacteria. To reduce bad breath, patients should use tongue scrapers daily and brush their teeth thoroughly twice a day. They can also reduce their risk of acid reflux by not eating or drinking alcohol before bed.


Drs. Julie and Joseph Boulos operate All Coast Dental at 2180 Garnet Ave, Suite 1-K, Pacific Beach, California, 92109. To schedule an appointment, call 858-270-4904 or visit All Coast Dental and fill out a contact sheet.


 

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Dental Phobia

Our doctors at All Costal Dental want our patients to feel comfortable when they visit. Going to the dentist can be an overwhelming and uncomfortable experience. Maintaining good oral hygiene includes visiting us twice a year for a cleaning and a checkup. With estimated 9% to 15% of people suffering from dental phobia, is it important for you to be able to cope with your dental fears.


Patients who suffer from dental phobia have a greater chance of developing gum disease and tooth decay. Some signs that you might have dental phobia include tense or nervousness, sleepless nights before the dentist, and the thought of the dentist makes you feel sick.


We encourage our patients to ask us questions before your appointment so we can make you feel more comfortable. Your concerns are our number one priority and we are happy to discuss what can help to ease your fears.


Drs. Julie and Joseph Boulos operate All Coast Dental at 2180 Garnet Ave, Suite 1-K, Pacific Beach, California, 92109. To schedule an appointment, please call 858-270-4904 or visit All Coast Dental and fill out a contact sheet.